Where do students live best in Schleswig-Holstein?

Schleswig-Holstein

Schleswig-Holstein is the northernmost of the 16 states of Germany, comprising most of the historical duchy of Holstein and the southern part of the former Duchy of Schleswig. Its capital city is Kiel; other notable cities are Lübeck and Flensburg.
The region is called Slesvig-Holsten in Danish and pronounced [ˌsle̝ːsvi ˈhʌlˌste̝ˀn]. In more dated English, it is also known as Sleswick-Holsatia. The Low German name is Sleswig-Holsteen, and the North Frisian name is Slaswik-Holstiinj. Historically, the name can also refer to a larger region, containing both present-day Schleswig-Holstein and the former South Jutland County (Northern Schleswig; now part of the Region of Southern Denmark) in Denmark.
The term "Holstein" derives from Old Saxon Holseta Land, (Holz and Holt mean wood in modern Standardised German and in literary English, respectively). Originally, it referred to the central of the three Saxon tribes north of the River Elbe: Tedmarsgoi (Dithmarschen), Holstein and Sturmarii (Stormarn). The area of the tribe of the Holsts was between the Stör River and Hamburg, and after Christianization, their main church was in Schenefeld. Saxon Holstein became a part of the Holy Roman Empire after Charlemagne's Saxon campaigns in the late eighth century. Since 811, the northern frontier of Holstein (and thus the Empire) was marked by the River Eider.
The term Schleswig comes from the city of Schleswig. The name derives from the Schlei inlet in the east and vik meaning inlet in Old Norse or settlement in Old Saxon, and cognate with the "-wick" or "-wich" element in place-names in Britain.
The Duchy of Schleswig or Southern Jutland was originally an integral part of Denmark, but was in medieval times established as a fief under the Kingdom of Denmark, with the same relation to the Danish Crown as for example Brandenburg or Bavaria vis-à-vis the Holy Roman Emperor. Around 1100, the Duke of Saxony gave Holstein, as it was his own country, to Count Adolf I of Schauenburg.
Source: Wikipedia

Student friendly Flensburg

As a student, it is important to us to be part of a city's life. During the course of study, leisure time is usually much more important than, for example, for families. Therefore, when we put together the criteria for students, we attached great importance to leisure activities but also to a good infrastructure. You don't want to spend the little time you have besides studying and a possibly necessary part-time job with long journeys to the nearest supermarket. And a suitable university nearby is certainly not harmful either.
Flensburg is with round about 1,199 points from a maximum of 1,400 the front-runner among students friendly cities and communities in Schleswig-Holstein. Kiel follows closely with 1,148 points. In third position, also following very closely, is Lübeck with 1,134 points.

Flensburg for students in numbers

Average linear distance to the nearest restaurant
111m vs. 2.3km
111m vs. 2.3km
Average linear distance to the nearest shop
127m vs. 2.1km
127m vs. 2.1km
Average linear distance to the next supermarket or groceries
387m vs. 3.9km
387m vs. 3.9km
Average number of inhabitants per shop
116.2 vs. 389
116.2 vs. 389
Average linear distance to the nearest university
1.7km vs. 18.3km
1.7km vs. 18.3km
Share of single households in the total number of households in %
50.8% vs. 31.2%
50.8% vs. 31.2%
Average number of inhabitants per restaurant
434.5 vs. 654.4
434.5 vs. 654.4
Share of households without children in the total number of households in %
77.4% vs. 62%
77.4% vs. 62%
Average linear distance to the next public swimming facility
3.1km vs. 5.9km
3.1km vs. 5.9km
Inhabitants between 20 and 29 years per accessible movie theater, theater and museum
755.2 vs. 83.8
755.2 vs. 83.8
Inhabitants between 20 and 29 years per restaurants, bars, pubs, fast food, cafés etc. in this region
64.6 vs. 58
64.6 vs. 58
Average number of inhabitants per supermarket
1,492 vs. 1,867
1,492 vs. 1,867
Share of residents between 20 and 29 in %
18.6% vs. 9.4%
18.6% vs. 9.4%
Share of vegetation, water and sport areas (excluding agricultural areas) in relation to the total area (excluding agricultural areas) in %
25.3% vs. 36.2%
25.3% vs. 36.2%